Literary Birthday - 13 September - Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl was born 13 September 1916, and died 23 November 1990

13th September is known as Roald Dahl Day

13 Quotes

  1. Don’t gobblefunk around with words.
  2. I began to realise how simple life could be if one had a regular routine to follow with fixed hours, a fixed salary, and very little original thinking to do.
  3. Nowadays you can go anywhere in the world in a few hours, and nothing is fabulous any more.
  4. The life of a writer is absolute hell … if he is a writer of fiction he lives in a world of fear. Each new day demands new ideas and he can never be sure whether he is going to come up with them or not.
  5. A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
  6. Two hours of writing fiction leaves this writer completely drained. For those two hours he has been in a different place with totally different people.
  7. I have a passion for teaching kids to become readers, to become comfortable with a book, not daunted. Books shouldn't be daunting, they should be funny, exciting and wonderful; and learning to be a reader gives a terrific advantage.
  8. It doesn’t matter who you are or what you look like so long as somebody loves you.
  9. And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don't believe in magic will never find it.
  10. If you have good thoughts they will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely.
  11. If a person has ugly thoughts, it begins to show on the face. And when that person has ugly thoughts every day, every week, every year, the face gets uglier and uglier until you can hardly bear to look at it.
  12. A person is a fool to become a writer. His only compensation is absolute freedom. He has no master except his own soul, and that, I am sure, is why he does it.
  13. Though my father was Norwegian, he always wrote his diaries in perfect English.

Follow this link to read what Dahl’s illustrator, Quentin Blake, had to say about his famous writing hut

There are also these Five facts you probably didn’t know about Roald Dahl

Dahl was a British novelist, short story writer, poet, fighter pilot and screenwriter. He became one of the world’s best-selling authors. His short stories are known for their unexpected endings, and his children’s books for their unsentimental, dark humour. His works include James and the Giant PeachCharlie and the Chocolate FactoryMatilda, The WitchesGeorge’s Marvellous Medicine  and The BFG.

Source for Image

 by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  LinkedIn,  Google+,  Tumblr,  and  Twitter.

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Roald Dahl's Writing Desk In His Writing Hut

Roald Dahl was a British novelist, short story writer, poet, fighter pilot and screenwriter.

Roald Dahl wrote at his writing desk in a hut.

Here’s what Dahl’s illustrator, Quentin Blake, had to say about the hut:

“I didn’t go into the shed very often, because the whole point of it as far as Roald was concerned was that it was private, a sanctuary where he could work where no one interrupted him. The whole of the inside was organised as a place for writing: so the old wing-back chair had part of the back burrowed out to make it more comfortable; he had a sleeping bag that he put his legs in when it was cold and a footstool to rest them on; he had a very characteristic Roald arrangement for a writing table with a bar across the arms of the chair and a cardboard tube that altered the angle of the board on which he wrote. As he didn’t want to move from his chair everything was within reach. He wrote on yellow legal paper with his favourite kind of pencils; he started off with a handful of them ready sharpened. He used to smoke and there is an ashtray with cigarette butts preserved to this day.

The table near to his right hand had all kinds of strange memorabilia on it, one of which was part of his own hip bone that had been removed; another was a ball of silver paper that he’d collected from bars of chocolate since he was a young man and it had gradually increased in size.”

Amanda Patterson by Amanda Patterson

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Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate

Matilda Wormwood’s Reading List (Matilda)

After reading The Secret Garden and Great Expectations, Roald Dahl writes, “Over the next six months, under Mrs. Phelps watchful and compassionate eye, Matilda read the following books:”

  • Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
  • Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
  • Gone to Earth by Mary Webb
  • Kim by Rudyard Kipling
  • The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
  • The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
  • The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner
  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  • The Good Companions by J.B. Priestley
  • Brighton Rock by Graham Greene
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell
  • She also reads:
  • The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
  • Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling
  • The Red Pony by John Steinbeck

And, if the film is to be believed, Moby Dick by Herman Melville.

Source: Reading List 

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Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Roald Dahl writes to a fan

Advice from authors to their fans

From Roald Dahl to Amy, a 7-year-old fan who sent him one of her dreams (oil, glitter, and colored water) in a bottle:

10th February 1989

Dear Amy,

I must write a special letter and thank you for the dream in the bottle. You are the first person in the world who has sent me one of these and it intrigued me very much. I also liked the dream. Tonight I shall go down to the village and blow it through the bedroom window of some sleeping child and see if it works.

With love from,

(Signed)

Roald Dahl

[Read more at Letters of Note]

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Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Writers in Wartime

Writers in Wartime   

  1. Ernest Hemingway, Ambulance Driver - WW1
  2. Kurt Vonnegut, Infantryman/Scout - WW2
  3. Tim O’Brien, Infantryman - Vietnam
  4. Evelyn Waugh, Royal Marines/Special Operations Executive - WW2
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Signals Officer Infantry - WW1
  6. Roald Dahl, Fighter Pilot - WW2

(Source: myimaginarybrooklyn)

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Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate