Literary Birthday - 25 September - Carlos Ruiz Zafón

Happy Birthday, Carlos Ruiz Zafón, born 25 September 1964

On Why He Writes:

As I said, I am in the business of storytelling. This is an art, a craft and a business, and I thank the Gods of Literature for that. I believe that when you pick up something I’ve written and pay for it, both in terms of your money and something much more valuable, your time, you are entitled to get the best I can produce. I believe this is not a hobby, it is a profession. If you’re pretentious enough to believe that what you write might be worth other people’s time (as I am), you should work hard enough to earn that privilege (as I do). Which brings me back to the question of why I write. Sometimes people ask me what piece of advice I would give to an aspiring author. I’d tell them that you should only become a writer if the possibility of not becoming one would kill you. Otherwise, you’d be better off doing something else. I became a writer, a teller of tales, because otherwise I would have died, or worse.

The Top 10 Ruiz Zafón Quotes About Books

  1. Every book, every volume you see here, has a soul. The soul of the person who wrote it and of those who read it and lived and dreamed with it. Every time a book changes hands, every time someone runs his eyes down its pages, its spirit grows and strengthens.
  2. Few things leave a deeper mark on the reader, than the first book that finds its way to his heart.
  3. I was raised among books, making invisible friends in pages that seemed cast from dust and whose smell I carry on my hands to this day.
  4. In the shop we buy and sell them, but in truth books have no owner. Every book you see here has been somebody’s best friend.
  5. I stepped into the bookshop and breathed in that perfume of paper and magic that strangely no one had ever thought of bottling.
  6. I had never known the pleasure of reading, of exploring the recesses of the soul, of letting myself be carried away by imagination, beauty, and the mystery of fiction and language. For me all those things were born with that novel.
  7. Bea says that the art of reading is slowly dying, that it’s an intimate ritual, that a book is a mirror that offers us only what we already carry inside us, that when we read, we do it with all our heart and mind, and great readers are becoming more scarce by the day.
  8. There are worse things than a prison of words.
  9. That book taught me that by reading, I could live more intensely. It could give me back the sight I had lost. For that reason alone, a book that didn’t matter to anyone changed my life.
  10. I leafed through the pages, inhaling the enchanted scent of promise that comes with all new books, and stopped to read the start of a sentence that caught my eye. 

Carlos Ruiz Zafón is is the author of six novels, including the international phenomenon The Shadow of the Wind. He is the most successful contemporary Spanish writer, along with Javier Sierra, whose works have been published in 42 countries, and Juan Gómez-Jurado, whose works have been published in 41 countries.

Source for Image

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~~~

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Carlos Ruiz Zafón’s Favourite Books About Books

Carlos Ruiz Zafoacuten8217s Favorite Books About Books  The Name of the Rosenbspby Umberto Eco ldquoA terrific postmodern Sherlock Holmesian intrigue set in a Benedictine monastery involving serial crime the Inquisition the power of knowledge and the written word those who conspire to control what others think and read and those who fight to preserve the light and beauty of creation independent thinking and reading Make sure to make it through the slightly harder-to-navigate initial section and yoursquoll find plenty of rewards once you plunge into the story proper This is probably one of the best novels of its kind and it offers a lot beyond the purely detectivesque storyrdquo The Neverending Storynbspby Michael Ende ldquoAllegedly a childrenrsquos book but actually a fable for all ages in which the magic of books and reading is illustrated through the wondrous journey of a kid who enters the world of the fabulous book he is reading Has the scent and the flavor of old-school adventure stories old bookstores and a world that today may seem vanished Delightful sweet and wiserdquo The Club Dumasnbspby Arturo Peacuterez-Reverte ldquoThis deliciously dark and witty novel by my compatriot the very talented Arturo Peacuterez-Reverte is one of the greatest bibliophile mysteries ever The old book lore is so well built into the plot that yoursquoll find yourself salivating at all the stuff you learn about how books were made An intrigue with supernatural overtones haunting chateaus old cities in Europe riddled with mystery and a cursed book that may or may not invoke the presence of the Prince of Darkness himself This is a terrific book and a perfect point of entry into Peacuterez-Revertersquos worldrdquo Fahrenheit 451nbspby Ray Bradbury ldquoA fable for our times a pitch-perfect tale of a future that looks too much like aspects of the present that invites us to think twice or thrice about it Therersquos an element of elegy for literature books for the beauty and importance of the world of the mind that I believe could only have been written from the perspective of a very perceptive author born and raised in the US Years ago I used to see the great late Ray Bradbury around Los Angeles a lot He did not drive and you could see him wearing shorts and a kind of safari-like attire at bus stops in bookstoreshellip A year before his passing I went to a birthday bash a great bookstore in Glendale Bookfellows was throwing for him He was already very old and not in good health but he had plenty of wit good humor and a humanity that to me looked like the antidote to half of the worldrsquos ills Take this and then explore the rest of his oeuvrerdquo On Writingnbspby Stephen King ldquoMost readers know the King through his many novels and stories What not so many know is that he also wrote this little book about the craft of writing and the life of the writer I believe this is the best book about the subject ever written not to mention the most entertaining and probably useful Totally devoid of pretension or snobbery and packed with intelligence humor and down-to-earth wisdom any aspiring or working writer should read this and get invaluable lessons from the King Donrsquot missrdquo Atonementnbspby Ian McEwan ldquoA powerful and beautifully built tale of loss guilt and potentially dangerous powers of storytelling The shaping of reality as a story the moral dimension of interpreting reality through fiction and the responsibility of the teller of tales are just a few of the themes explored in this brief and very well-made book among the best in this authorrsquos long career Typewriters can kill Find out all about itrdquo Via Goodreads Image

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

“A terrific postmodern Sherlock Holmesian intrigue set in a Benedictine monastery involving serial crime, the Inquisition, the power of knowledge and the written word, those who conspire to control what others think and read, and those who fight to preserve the light and beauty of creation, independent thinking, and reading. Make sure to make it through the slightly harder-to-navigate initial section, and you’ll find plenty of rewards once you plunge into the story proper. This is probably one of the best novels of its kind, and [it] offers a lot beyond the purely detectivesque story.”

The Neverending Story by Michael Ende

“Allegedly a children’s book, but actually a fable for all ages in which the magic of books and reading is illustrated through the wondrous journey of a kid who enters the world of the fabulous book he is reading. Has the scent and the flavor of old-school adventure stories, old bookstores, and a world that today may seem vanished. Delightful, sweet, and wise.”

The Club Dumas by Arturo Pérez-Reverte

“This deliciously dark and witty novel by my compatriot, the very talented Arturo Pérez-Reverte, is one of the greatest bibliophile mysteries ever. The old book lore is so well built into the plot that you’ll find yourself salivating at all the stuff you learn about how books were made. An intrigue with supernatural overtones, haunting chateaus, old cities in Europe riddled with mystery, and a cursed book that may or may not invoke the presence of the Prince of Darkness himself. This is a terrific book and a perfect point of entry into Pérez-Reverte’s world.”

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

“A fable for our times, a pitch-perfect tale of a future that looks too much like aspects of the present that invites us to think twice or thrice about it. There’s an element of elegy for literature, books, for the beauty and importance of the world of the mind that, I believe, could only have been written from the perspective of a very perceptive author born and raised in the U.S. Years ago I used to see the great, late Ray Bradbury around Los Angeles a lot. He did not drive, and you could see him wearing shorts and a kind of safari-like attire at bus stops, in bookstores… A year before his passing I went to a birthday bash a great bookstore in Glendale, Bookfellows, was throwing for him. He was already very old and not in good health, but he had plenty of wit, good humor, and a humanity that, to me, looked like the antidote to half of the world’s ills. Take this, and then explore the rest of his oeuvre.”

On Writing by Stephen King

“Most readers know the King through his many novels and stories. What not so many know is that he also wrote this little book about the craft of writing and the life of the writer. I believe this is the best book about the subject ever written, not to mention the most entertaining and probably useful. Totally devoid of pretension or snobbery and packed with intelligence, humor, and down-to-earth wisdom, any aspiring, or working, writer should read this and get invaluable lessons from the King. Don’t miss.”

Atonement by Ian McEwan

“A powerful and beautifully built tale of loss, guilt, and potentially dangerous powers of storytelling. The shaping of reality as a story, the moral dimension of interpreting reality through fiction, and the responsibility of the teller of tales are just a few of the themes explored in this brief and very well-made book, among the best in this author’s long career. Typewriters can kill. Find [out] all about it.”

Via: Goodreads Image

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