Literary Birthday - 12 June - Anne Frank

Anne Frank was born 12 June 1929, and died early March 1945

The Top 12 Anne Frank Quotes

  1. Because paper has more patience than people.
  2. Everyone has inside of him a piece of good news. The good news is that you don’t know how great you can be! How much you can love! What you can accomplish! And what your potential is!
  3. If I read a book that impresses me, I have to take myself firmly by the hand, before I mix with other people; otherwise they would think my mind rather queer.
  4. The only way to truly know a person is to argue with them. For when they argue in full swing, then they reveal their true character.
  5. The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quiet, alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be.
  6. In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can’t build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery and death.
  7. Laziness may appear attractive, but work gives satisfaction.
  8. I have often been downcast, but never in despair; I regard our hiding as a dangerous adventure, romantic and interesting at the same time. In my diary I treat all the privations as amusing. I have made up my mind now to lead a different life from other girls and, later on, different from ordinary housewives. My start has been so very full of interest, and that is the sole reason why I have to laugh at the humorous side of the most dangerous moments.
  9. The final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands.
  10. For someone like me, it is a very strange habit to write in a diary. Not only that I have never written before, but it strikes me that later neither I, nor anyone else, will care for the outpouring of a thirteen year old schoolgirl.
  11. I want to be useful or bring enjoyment to people, even those I’ve never met. I want to go on living even after my death! And that’s why I’m grateful to God for having given me this gift, which I can use to develop and to express all that’s inside me!
  12. Who would ever think that so much went on in the soul of a young girl?

Anne Frank gained international fame posthumously. The Diary of Anne Frankdocuments her experiences hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.

Source for Image

Amanda Patterson by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Literary Birthday - 25 May - Raymond Carver

Raymond Carver was born 25 May 1938, and died 2 August 1988

Raymond Carver: 10 Remarkable Writing Quotes

  1. It’s possible, in a poem or short story, to write about commonplace things and objects using commonplace but precise language, and to endow those things—a chair, a window curtain, a fork, a stone, a woman’s earring—with immense, even startling power.
  2. I write the first draft quickly. This is most often done in longhand. I simply fill up the pages as rapidly as I can. …With the first draft it’s a question of getting down the outline, the scaffolding of the story. Then on subsequent revisions I’ll see to the rest of it. When I’ve finished the longhand draft I’ll type a version of the story and go from there. It always looks different to me, better, of course, after it’s typed up. When I’m typing the first draft, I’ll begin to rewrite and add and delete a little then. The real work comes later, after I’ve done three or four drafts of the story. 
  3. I think a little menace is fine to have in a story. For one thing, it’s good for the circulation.
  4. It’s akin to style, what I’m talking about, but it isn’t style alone. It is the writer’s particular and unmistakable signature on everything he writes. It is his world and no other. This is one of the things that distinguishes one writer from another. Not talent. There’s plenty of that around. But a writer who has some special way of looking at things and who gives artistic expression to that way of looking: that writer may be around for a time.
  5. That’s all we have, finally, the words, and they had better be the right ones, with the punctuation in the right places so that they can best say what they are meant to say. If the words are heavy with the writer’s own unbridled emotions, or if they are imprecise and inaccurate for some other reason — if the words are in any way blurred — the reader’s eyes will slide right over them and nothing will be achieved.
  6. I never wrote so much as a line worth a nickel when I was under the influence of alcohol.
  7. You’re told time and again when you’re young to write about what you know, and what do you know better than your own secrets? But unless you’re a special kind of writer, and a very talented one, it’s dangerous to try and write volume after volume on The Story of My Life.
  8. I’m always learning something. Learning never ends.
  9. Anyone can express himself, or herself, but what writers and poets want to do in their work, more than simply express themselves, is communicate, yes?
  10. When I’m writing, I write every day. It’s lovely when that’s happening. One day dovetailing into the next. Sometimes I don’t even know what day of the week it is…I put in a lot of hours at the desk, ten or twelve or fifteen hours at a stretch, day after day.

Carver was an American short story writer and poet. As a young man, he studied  creative writing. After being hospitalized with acute alcoholism in his late thirties, the stories Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? were published. Carver stopped drinking and The American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters awarded him a fellowship to write full-time. He was considered a major writer of the late 20th century and a major force in the revitalization of the American short story literature in the 1980s.  

Source for Image

 by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Google+,  Tumblr  and  Twitter.  

~~~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate

Literary Birthday - 9 May - J.M. Barrie

J.M. Barrie was born 9 May 1860, anddied 19 June 1937

10 Quotes

  1. When the first baby laughed for the first time, the laugh broke into a thousand pieces and they all went skipping about, and that was the beginning of fairies.
  2. To die will be an awfully big adventure.
  3. The life of every man is a diary in which he means to write one story, and writes another; and his humblest hour is when he compares the volume as it is with what he vowed to make it.
  4. The printing press is either the greatest blessing or the greatest curse of modern times, one sometimes forgets which.
  5. Never say goodbye because goodbye means going away and going away means forgetting.
  6. Those who bring sunshine to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves.
  7. You know that place between sleep and awake, the place where you can still remember dreaming? That’s where I’ll always love you. That’s where I’ll be waiting.
  8. Every time a child says I don’t believe in fairies there is a fairy somewhere that falls down dead. 
  9. God gave us memory so that we might have roses in December.
  10. The secret of happiness is not in doing what one likes, but in liking what one does.

Barrie was a Scottish author and dramatist, best remembered as the creator of Peter Pan. Barrie was made a baronet by George V in 1913, and a member of the Order of Merit in 1922. Before his death, he gave the rights to the Peter Pan works to London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital, which continues to benefit from them.

Source for Image

Amanda Patterson by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Literary Birthday - 7 May - Peter Carey

Happy Birthday, Peter Carey, born 7 May 1943

10 Peter Carey Quotes

  1. If you ever read one of my books I hope you’ll think it looks so easy. In fact, I wrote those chapters 20 times over, and over, and over, and that if you want to write at a good level, you’ll have to do that too.
  2. Being famous as a writer is like being famous in a village. It’s not really any very heady fame.
  3. I went to work in 1962, and by ‘64 I was writing all the time, every night and every weekend. It didn’t occur to me that, having read nothing and knowing nothing, I was in no position to write a book.
  4. My greatest pleasure is to invent. My continual mad ambition is to make something true and beautiful that never existed in the world before.
  5. Good writing of course requires talent, and no one can teach you to have talent. It also needs amazing will. Your role as teacher is to nurture and protect your students while, at the same time, forcing them beyond their limits, encouraging them to see the world, to imagine every action in the moment, to see the body as part of dialogue, and basically to write as if their life depended on it. 
  6. Writers, at least writers of fiction, are always full of anxiety and worry.
  7. One has to be able to twist and change and distort characters, play with them like clay, so everything fits together. Real people don’t permit you to do that.
  8. History is like a bloodstain that keeps on showing on the wall no matter how many new owners take possession, no matter how many times we paint over it.
  9. The huge pleasures are discovering things that you didn’t know and creating characters who are not based on anybody you’ve ever seen. When I first set out to be a writer I had no real interest in character and certainly no aptitude or ability to create character. The pleasures of having created those characters are enormous. It’s a very privileged way to spend your mornings. 
  10. Writers live with doubt and failure. Most days we don’t succeed. Most days we know we have to rewrite, that we haven’t yet arrived. This is not always unpleasant, but it can be. Perfectionism, on the other hand, is self-defeating. A perfectionist can never finish the task at hand.

Carey is an Australian novelist. He is one of only four writers to have won the Booker Prize twice—the others being J. M. Coetzee, J. G. Farrell and Hilary Mantel. Carey won his first Booker Prize in 1988 for Oscar and Lucinda, and won for the second time in 2001 with True History of the Kelly Gang. Carey is thought to be  Australia’s next contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Source for Image

Amanda Patterson by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Literary Birthday - 6 May - Jeffery Deaver

Happy Birthday, Jeffery Deaver, born 6 May 1950

Jeffery Deaver: 10 Quotes On Writing

  1. For me a thriller is a very carefully structured story. I spend eight months outlining and researching the novel before I begin to write a single word of the prose. The skills I use to do that are the same I used when practicing law — researching and structuring a legal document or case.
  2. Outlining is the most efficient way to structure a novel to achieve the greatest emotional impact. The most breathtaking prose and brilliantly drawn characters are wasted if the plot meanders and digresses. Outlining lets you create a framework that compels your audience to keep reading from the first page to the last…Best of all, once the outline is finished, you can write the book very quickly and in any order.
  3. Write about settings you’re familiar with. I try to add some local color and description, but also try not to go overboard — too much description can detract from the story.
  4. Style is aural. There’s just something about a good turn of phrase, not in a clever punning way, but in that it just sounds nice. When I sit down to write, I always try to do it in a way that there’s kind of a catchiness about what I write—so that in the oral tradition of storytelling it’s more memorable.
  5. My goal has always been to be a working, professional novelist, nothing more than that. Success to me is being able to make a living by telling stories. I don’t think it gets any better than that. I just wish there were more hours in the day—to write as much as I’d like and still do the public appearances and blurbing and author touring around the world that I’d like to do to meet fans and my publishers and editors. 
  6. My books are primarily plot driven but the best plot in the world is useless if you don’t populate them with characters that readers can care about. So I work hard to present the human side of my characters while not neglecting the plot. Ideally, I like to integrate the human issues into the suspense story itself.  In suspense novels even subplots about relationships have to have conflict.
  7. I’ve often said that there’s no such thing as writer’s block; the problem is idea block.
  8. The best way to learn about writing is to study the work of other writers you admire.
  9. I revise a great deal. My publisher doesn’t even get a peek at my manuscript until I’ve revised it at least twenty or thirty times (and I mean major revisions).
  10. Ah, there’s nothing like music. It’s seductive, it’s all-consuming, it’s emotional, it’s infinitely creative … . I was a singer-songwriter, not particularly talented musically but drawn to the craft of song writing. I liked the challenge of writing in a very concise structure in which both meaning and form are important.

Read my Interview with Jeffery Deaver in August 2012

Deaver is an American mystery/crime writer of more than 30 books. He has a bachelor of journalism degree from the University of Missouri and a law degree from Fordham University. He practiced law before embarking on a successful career as a best-selling novelist. His novels include The Cold MoonThe Bone Collector, and A Maiden’s Grave.

Amanda Patterson by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Literary Birthday- 30 April - Annie Dillard

Happy Birthday, Annie Dillard, born 30 April 1945

10 Annie Dillard Quotes On Writing

  1. All my books started out as extravagant and ended up pure and plain. 
  2. At its best, the sensation of writing is that of any unmerited grace. It is handed to you, but only if you look for it. 
  3. Every book has an intrinsic impossibility, which its writer discovers as soon as his first excitement dwindles. 
  4. I worked so hard all my life, and all I want to do now is read.
  5. One of the things I know about writing is this: spend it all, shoot it, play it, lose it, all, right away, every time. Do not hoard what seems good for a later place in the book or for another book; give it, give it all, give it now. 
  6. Society places the writer so far beyond the pale that society does not regard the writer at all.
  7. I do not so much write a book as sit up with it, as a dying friend. I hold its hand and hope it will get better.
  8. It is no less difficult to write a sentence in a recipe than sentences inMoby Dick. So you might as well write Moby Dick.
  9. Many writers do little else but sit in small rooms recalling the real world.
  10. If you’re going to publish a book, you probably are going to make a fool of yourself. 

Dillard is an American poet, essayist, and novelist known for her intensely poetic and precise prose. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 1975 for her collection of narrative essays, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

Source for Image

Amanda Patterson by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Literary Birthday - 30 April - John Boyne

Happy Birthday, John Boyne, born 30 April 1971

John Boyne: 10 Observations On Writing

  1. I want to write stories that matter, that have a real point to them. I’m not interested in vampires.
  2. When I started out I thought that a life as a writer would be simply about staying at home, writing books, publishing them and moving on to the next one. But writers also have to be performers these days. I spend a large portion of my year either on book tours or attending international literary festivals and audiences demand that, if they’re giving up an hour to hear you speak, you give them a good show. And this is a skill that a writer only develops over time. There’s such a dichotomy between the two worlds: the first is so private and solitary, a life lived in the mind, the second so public and theatrical. Fortunately, I rather enjoy both.
  3. I read everything that interests me - contemporary novels, biographies, histories, classics. Like most writers and avid readers, I have a pile of books beside me as I type this that I want to read.
  4. My two greatest influences are Charles Dickens and John Irving, writers separated by more than a century.
  5. When I was a student on the creative writing course at the University of East Anglia in ‘94/’95, I was taught by the novelist Malcolm Bradbury. He told us that we should write every single day, 365 days a year, even Christmas Day. That whatever we were working on would only get finished by writing, writing, writing. I followed this advice and it is quite rare that I spend a day without committing at least a few paragraphs to page. 
  6. The idea that you can’t explore contemporary themes in a historical setting is ludicrous. Do I want to write a novel set today? Only if I have the right story to tell. The times don’t matter at all - it’s always the story, the story, the story. 
  7. Children’s fiction is a place of incredible passion - among writers, publishers, librarians and teachers - and the standard of writing is higher than it has ever been.
  8. It’s not easy making a living as a writer and for many years I worked at a Waterstones in Dublin. It was a good environment for an aspiring writer, with lots of events and authors appearing.
  9. The truth is that I can’t remember a moment when I didn’t want to be a writer. From childhood, I loved books, I loved stories and I loved writing my own. 
  10. I think a lack of self-consciousness is important. Feeling that one can try different styles, different types of writing without everything having to be perfect. As a young writer, there is no chance that everything you write will be published so it’s worth experimenting.

Boyne is an Irish author who has written seven novels for adults and three novels for children, as well as a number of short stories. His novels are published in 46 languages. The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas has sold more than 5 million copies, and is a #1 New York Times Best-seller. It has been adapted for film.

Source for Image

Amanda Patterson by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Literary Birthday – 23 April – William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare was born 23 April 1564, and died 23 April 1616

10 Famous William Shakespeare Quotes

  1. To be, or not to be: that is the question.
  2. Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.
  3. Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon ‘em.
  4. If you prick us do we not bleed? If you tickle us do we not laugh? If you poison us do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?
  5. There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
  6. ‘Tis better to be brief than tedious.
  7. If music be the food of love, play on.
  8. Love is a smoke and is made with the fume of sighs.
  9. Love sought is good, but giv’n unsought is better.
  10. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones.

Read more about the International Day of the Book - 23 April - William Shakespeare’s Birthday

Sonnet 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright. He wrote more than 30 plays, which are usually divided into four categories: histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances. His best known works include Romeo and Juliet,HamletOthelloKing Lear,  Macbeth,  A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Antony and Cleopatra

He is regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and is known as ‘Bard of Avon’. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. His birthday is celebrated as the International Day of the Book.

 by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Literary Birthday - 20 April - John van de Ruit

Happy Birthday, John van de Ruit, born 20 April 1975

John van de Ruit’s Top 10 Writing Tips

  1. Get rid of your romantic notions of what writing is. It’s like climbing a mountain; not sprinting.
  2. Open your creative space. Work on unlocking what it is you have inside yourself. Work out what sort of story you’re trying to tell and the best way to tell it.
  3. Be patient with yourself. You will not create a masterpiece without any hard work.
  4. Let your characters possess you. Let them live inside you. You can liken this to method acting. How do they speak, move? What words would they use?
  5. Keep your head down. Finish your first draft. Don’t go back and try to fix everything until you’ve done this.
  6. Rewriting and editing are just as important as writing. The first draft is the rough outline of a sculpture. The next five or six or seven are the refining of that sculpture.
  7. Wrestle with yourself. Challenge yourself constantly. 
  8. Writing is about making choices. You have a choice on every page. Every sentence counts. If in doubt, go with your gut.
  9. Find your groove/rhythm/pattern and write according to that. Make sure you write a minimum number of words every day. 1000 words should be the least you do every day.
  10. Use an outline. I make extensive notes and outlines before I begin writing. I also use a diary as an outline because the books are written in diary format.  

P.S. Don’t forget to dream big because it can really happen.

Source for Tips 

John van de Ruit is South Africa’s most popular author. His series of Spud books have sold more than half a million copies in South Africa alone. The first and second books have been made into movies starring John Cleese. John’s final book in the series is Spud - Exit, Pursued by a Bear.

 by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.

Literary Birthday - 17 April - Thornton Wilder

Thornton Wilder, was born 17 April 1897, and died 7 December 1975

10 Quotes

  1. It would be a very wonderful thing if we could see more and more works that close that gulf between highbrows and lowbrows.
  2. When you’re safe at home you wish you were having an adventure; when you’re having an adventure you wish you were safe at home.
  3. There is a land of the living and a land of the dead, and the bridge is love, the only survival, the only meaning.
  4. We can only be said to be alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures.
  5. I write in order to discover on my shelf a new book that I would enjoy reading, or to see a new play that would engross me.
  6. There’s nothing like eavesdropping to show you that the world outside your head is different from the world inside your head.
  7. An incinerator is a writer’s best friend.
  8. The future author is one who discovers that language, the exploration and manipulation of the resources of language, will serve him in winning through to his way.
  9. Literature is the orchestration of platitudes.
  10. If you write to impress it will always be bad, but if you write to express it will be good.

Wilder was an American playwright and novelist. He won three Pulitzer Prizes—for the novel The Bridge of San Luis Rey and for the two plays Our Town and The Skin of Our Teeth and a U.S. National Book Award for the novel The Eighth Day.

Source for Image

Amanda Patterson by Amanda Patterson.  Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Tumblr,  Google+,  LinkedIn, and  Twitter.

~~~

Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. Writers Write - Write to communicate.